30 August 2011

Averasboro Civil War Battlefield & Museum

The Battle of Averasboro took place in March 1865, and it was the first significant resistance the Union forces experienced as they barreled through the Carolinas and Georgia. The Battle of Bentonfield (located in Johnston County, NC) took place approximately three days later.

The Averasboro Battlefield Commission is responsible for preserving the historic site, and they are hosting a Civil War Re-Enactment on 17-18 September 2011.

The site is located in Dunn, North Carolina, which is in Harnett County. Directions and additional information can be found here for those of you who are interested.

22 August 2011

Ancestor Profiles - Charles Fletcher Campbell, Sr.

15 December 1887 - 9 July 1963

Charles Fletcher Campbell was my great grand uncle. Born 15 December 1887 in Randolph County, NC to John Milton Campbell and Malinda Lula Jennings Campbell (my paternal 2nd great grandparents), Charles was the oldest of five children.

He married Troy Louetta Bell of Iredell County, NC in 1908 and they had nine children together. According to my research, their children (only those who are known to be deceased) were:

  • Addie M. Campbell (1910-1996)
  • Agnes Frances Campbell (1912-2000)
  • John Webster Campbell (1915-2004)
  • Charles Fletcher Campbell, Jr. (1918-1996)
  • Helen Elizabeth Campbell (1922-1973)
  • Clarence Jennings Campbell (1924-2001)
  • Donnie Campbell (1932-1934)

21 August 2011

World War I Draft Registration Card "C"

The third registration for the World War I draft occurred on 12 September 1918. This was for men between the ages of 18-21 and 31-45 (men born between 11 Sept 1872 and 12 Sept 1900).

This registration card contained 20 questions on the front and required the following information:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Age
  • Date of birth
  • Race
  • Occupation
  • Citizenship status
  • Nearest living relative (name and address)
  • Name and address of employer
  • Physical appearance (height, build, hair and eye color, physical disabilities)

A blank card can be found below.



Sources: Ancestry.com. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.

20 August 2011

World War I Draft Registration Card "B"

World War I Draft Registration Card "B" may also sometimes be referred to as the Ten Question Card. This draft began on 5 June 1918 and was for all males who had celebrated their 21st birthday since the previous registration period (Card "A").

Also, men who hadn't previously registered and who were not already in the military were required to complete one of these cards. A supplemental registration, which occurred on 24 August 1918, had to be completed by all males who had celebrated their 21st birthday since 5 June 1918.

Information that can be found on these cards includes the following:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Address
  • Date and place of birth
  • Father's place of birth
  • Occupation
  • Citizenship status
  • Employer's name and address
  • Dependent information (if any)
  • Nearest living relative (name and address)
  • Physical appearance (height, build, hair and eye color, physical disabilities)

A blank form can be found below.






Sources: Ancestry.com. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.
Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.

19 August 2011

World War I Draft Registration Card "A"

World War I Draft Registration Card A (also referred to as the Twelve-Question Card) was the card used for the first round of registrations (5 June 1917). It includes the following information:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Address
  • Date and place of birth
  • Citizenship status
  • Employer's name and address
  • Dependent information
  • Marital status
  • Prior military service/rank
  • Physical appearance (height, build, hair and eye color, obvious disabilities)
  • Signature

A blank registration card can be found below.




Sources: Ancestry.com. World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.

    18 August 2011

    Looking Ahead to April 2012 - 1940 Census Records

    When the 1940 census is released in April 2012, ancestry.com is planning to make the records available for free to everyone for a certain period of time. They are planning to make all of the data available through 2013, though they won't be loading all of it at one time next April.

    The National Archives will have digital images available online for free. They have already provided lots of information regarding what to expect from these documents, including a list of questions that were asked on the 1940 census.

    Questions include:

    • Location (street name, house number)
    • Number of people per household
      • Home owned or rented?
      • Value of home (if owned) or monthly rent payment
      • Does this household live on a farm?
    • Name of each person (whose usual place of residence was in a particular household)
    • Relationship of each listed person to the head of the household
    • Personal descriptions (sex, race, age, marital status)
    • Education (highest grade or level completed)
    • Place of birth
    • Citizenship
    • Residence as of 1 April 1935
    • Employment status (for everyone age 14 and over)
    • Occupation, industry, and class of worker
    • Income in 1939
    Supplementary Questions:
    • Place of birth of mother and father
    • Native language
    • Veteran status (United States military)
    • Social security information (does each person have a social security card, for example)
    • For all women who are or have been married:
      • Has this woman been married more than once?
      • Age at first marriage
      • Number of children ever born (but don't include stillbirths)

    13 August 2011

    Apoplexy as a Cause of Death


    I've recently discovered an interesting cause of death listed on a death certificate: apoplexy. That was it. No elaboration or explanation; just that one word.

    Not having heard of that one before (not as an official cause of death, anyway), I decided to investigate. Apparently in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, apoplexy was commonly noted as a cause of death in cases where the patient suddenly suffered from some type of attack of the brain. This could have been anything from prolonged unconsciousness to partial or complete paralysis.

    Most attacks of apoplexy were precipitated by some symptom such as a bad headache, vomiting, confusion, or numbness/tingling of the extremities.

    I found it interesting that, in some cases, incidents of apoplexy were often mistaken for inebriation and some patients were simply left alone to "sleep it off". Only qualified medical professionals were likely able to recognize the seriousness of a person's condition because of the subtle differences between alcohol intoxication and apoplexy.